"Heritage Festival 2002" Plans Are Underway

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, April 2002,
April 2002
Original Images:

Plans for “The Heritage Festival, 2002” are well underway with Betty Jones at the helm.

Betty, this year's Festival Chairwoman, has been meeting with the committee chairmen since early in January and is really doing a great job in this capacity.

Nathalie Edmunds, Festival Chairwoman for many years, is serving as the co-ordinator of the Huron Street activities and our Museum is high on her list of prominent sites.

The historical old house will be open to the public, free of charge, on all three days of the Festival, August 16, 17 and 18. Visitors will get a tour of the rooms and see the furnishings, utensils and personal items used by the residents of Ypsilanti in the 1800s.

Many docents, male ad female, are needed to guide our visitors through the Museum during the Festival. This is an opportunity to get better acquainted with the history of Ypsilanti, be of significant help to visitors during a two hour shift, and work in air-conditioned comfort. Very little training is needed. Each docent i provided with a “guide card” bearing the information about the area to which they've been assigned.

If you think you'd like to be a volunteer (and have a nice break from the August heat), please call Joan Carpenter … 971-0536. Your help will be greatly appreciated!

Rain on Monday means several rainy days that week.

If the sun sets clear on Tuesday, expect rain before Friday.

If it rains on the “first of the month,” most of the month will be wet.

Rain on the first Sunday of the month means rain on the three following Sundays

If dandelions bloom in April, expect a hot, wet July.

If the sun sets behind the clouds on Thursday, expect rain before Saturday.

A windstorm on New Year's Day means floods later in the year.

Director's Report

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, November 1987,
November 1987
Original Images:

Author: Ann McCarthy

Director's Report
The Arts and Craft Demonstration held October 17th was a huge success. Eighty-five people signed the Guest book. We had 13 artisans, ranging from Bobbin Lace Making to Woodcarving. A delicious lunch, prepared by the members, was served.










News from the Archives Office

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, April 1987,
April 1987
Original Images:

Author: Billie Zolkosky

Spring is here as I look out the window, the sun is shining flowers are blooming, herb garden is coming up but oh, I must get back to work.

We are looking for suggestions on ideas for a float for the 4th of July parade, (workers too). I am sure some of you would enjoy putting your energy into building one. We would keep it in tact and use it in the Festival Parade in August also. So think about it and give me a call at the office and I shall get the information and your name to the proper chairman for follow-up.

DUES INFORMATION

Dues are due January 1st of each year. They are as follows:

Single $3.00
Family $5.00
Business $50.00
Life Member $100.00

Where else can you get a bargain like this?

If you are not a member and would be interested in joining fill out the bottom of this sheet and mail it to the Office or stop by the Office. Remember, Office hours-9:00 A.M.-12:00 Noon, Monday through Friday.

Ypsilanti's Heritage Festival On the Way Again

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, April 1987,
April 1987
Original Images:

August 21, 22 and 23rd brings all the fun, color and excitement of Ypsilanti's Yesteryear Festival back to Depot Town and Riverside Park.

Colorful flags, tents, artists and craftsmen will line the Huron River in the park. The Franzen Bros., old time circus will thrill all comers in Frog Island Park.

Loads of activities like a horse-shoe pitching contest, Marble Tournament, a Children's Talent contest, Antique costume fashion show and free entertainment on the dock in Riverside Park are planned for fair-goers.

The Wallenda's high wire act will be a stellar attraction. The Northwest Territories Association will be encamped at the south end of Riverside park for all who delight in creative anachronism.

Parades, battles, fife and drum groups, country music, jazz, quilts, antique steam and gas engines, food-all this and more on tap for our Sesquicentennial Celebration.

Invite everyone home for Michigan's 150th Birthday.

Contact Ypsilanti Visitor's and Convention Bureau for brochures and schedules 482-4920.

Museum Gift Shop

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, June 1986,
June 1986
Original Images:

Author: Marge Gauntlett

We are planning already for the Heritage Festival in August and even for the Christmas holidays. Some merchandise just arriving includes:
Michigan and United States Flags
4 × 6 and 8 × 12
Victorian Postcards
Linan Towels (new designs)
Children's Aprons
Children's Tote Bags
AND MUCH MORE TO COME!!!!!!!!!






News from the Administration Committee

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, October 1985,
October 1985
Original Images:

Author: Doris Milliman

A successful Craft Demonstration was held at the Museum on Saturday, October 12th, from 10:00 A.M., to 4:00 P.M.

Those who visited were privileged to observe the Following at work:

Mrs. Arlene Post, Mrs. Lee Palmiere and Mrs. Joan McGuire were hooking rugs.

Miss Betty Tunnicliffe was making corn husk dolls.

Mrs. Clara Huston and Mrs. Anna Anderson was doing intricate tatting.

Anna Satero and Kathy Campbell were making Bobbin Lace.

Mr. William Hamilton was caning a chair.

Mrs. Jo Calkins was showing how she made baskets and had several on display.

Mrs. Justina Eibler was busy doing wood carving.

Mrs. Billis Wardell and Mrs. Sue Binder were quilting and they, too, had a display of their work.

Miss Eileen Harrison showed how her popular clothes-pin dolls were made.

Due to the response to this event, we plan to have another demonstration next year.

The Committee furnished lunch to those who so graciously gave of their time to show their skills.

Committee members who worked on this project were:

Mrs. LaVerne Howard
Mrs. Don Wardell
Mrs. David Gauntlett
Mrs. Wm. McCarthy
Miss Doris Milliman
Mrs. Arthur Howard
Miss Eileen Harrison
We give special thanks to Mr. LaVerne Howard and Mr. David Gauntlett for their valuable help and encouragement, and to Mr. Arthur Howard for assisting the guides.

We also thank Miss Betty Tunnicliffe for making the attractive posters and helping with the distribution of them.

The next project for this committee is to conduct a workshop for all guides, at which time procedures will be reviewed and updated. Every guides is expected to be present at one of the sessions to be held on November 7, 1985 at the Museum. One is at 10:00 A.M., and the other at 2:00 P.M., we feel that it is important to meet with the guides at least once a year for instruction and discuss matters of interest about the Museum.

Doris Milliman, Chairperson, Administration Committee

Letter to the Members from YHS President David Gauntlett

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, August 1985,
August 1985
Original Images:

To All the Members:

I hope that everyone is enjoying a delightful summer-vacationing, swimming, fishing, sunning or just plain resting. Although there has not been much activity at the Museum the last couple of months, the Archives has been a beehive due to the information various people and groups want in preparation for the Ypsilanti Heritage Festival to be held the weekend of August 23, 24 and 25th. Although the stepped up activity at this time makes additional work for Foster Fletcher and Billie Zolkosky, it is nice to know that we can contribute so much to the authenticity of the theme of the Festival.

In regard to the Society's activity during the Festival, this year we will not hold our Annual Trash and Treasure Sale due to the unavailability of the Carriage Barn. In its place the Board decided to hold a raffle, in which we give away Cash Prizes and some items from our Museum Gift Shop. As a consequence, I am asking every member to do their best to sell at least five raffle tickets. It is important that we have a good sale as this is our one big money-making project of the year. I know you will do your best and ahead of time I thank you for your effort.

David R. Gauntlett
President-Ypsilanti Historical Society





News from the Administrative Committee

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, August 1985,
August 1985
Original Images:

Guide's Luncheon.

The Museum's Administration Committee, with the cooperation of the Historical Society's Board Members, were hosts and hostesses at a luncheon for the guides who are so loyal and helpful during the year.

Sixty-three guests were present at the Ladies' Literary Club, June 19, 1985 to enjoy the delicious food and friendly atmosphere.

Kathryn Howard, Ann McCarthy and Billie Wardell solicited and arranged the food that was served from a buffet table. The tables were beautifully decorated with vines interspersed with arrangements of garden flowers, all done by Deci Howard, Marg Gauntlett and Billie Wardell. The tables with their pale green tablecloths and napkins were arranged by Ethel O'Connor, Eileen Harrison and Doris Milliman.

Laverne Howard asked the blessing preceding the luncheon.

The program which was planned by the committee was piano duets played by Eva Kelly and Jim Anderson. The latter is from Livonia and both were music teachers in the Wayne-Westland School System.

David Gauntlett and Ethel O'Connor each spoke briefly regarding the helpfulness of the guides in service to the Museum.

Ethel O'Connor is arranging the schedule of guides at the Museum during the Festival, August 23, 24, and 25th. If you would be interested in assisting, please call Ethel at 482-7952.

Doris Milliman, Chairperson, Administration Committee.

Chronology 1884-1886

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, August 1985,
August 1985
Original Images:






1884 The Ypsilanti Commercial

January 5- 1400 signatures on a Petition in favor of confirmation of Miss Frances L. Stewart as Postmistress.

January 10- Grand Opening of the Bath House-D. L. Quirk, Charles King, Robert Lambie, I. N. Conklin, W. H. Hawkins and C.S. Wortley, Committee all in attendance with many others.

January 19- The Hawkins House Hotel and property advertised for sale under Mortgage Foreclosure for $7,025.00, I.N. Conklin, Mortagee.

January 25- The G.A.R., in Michigan numbers 250 Posts, with 10,529 members.
ADS APPEARING: A. B. Bell, Dentist-will make best rubber plates for $8.00. Gold and Silver fillings 25% off.

Office over Joe Sanders Clothing Store.

Carson & Rowell, Bankrupt-17 Congress Street (Michigan Avenue) Grocery and Crockery.

Barnum & Earl-27 Congress Street-Complete line of Jewelry and Silverware.

C.M. Boss-25 Congress Street-Successors to Robbins & Rathfon-Groceries.

J. M. Samson, Hardware-17 North Huron Street.

March 13- Standard Time adopted nationally and time zones set up

May 4 & 5- Financial Panic in New York City.

October 25- A large gathering of friends and relatives to celebrate the 50th Wedding Anniversary of Mr. & Mrs. Van Dusen on Mill (Maple) Street.

November 22- Died, Mrs. Amanda Buckbee, November 14, 1884, widow of Walter A. Buckbee. She was born December 12, 1801 in Hindsber, Vermont; sister of Ira M. Weed, Pastor of the Presbyterian Church.

December 13- The Deed Committee on the Carpenter Post No. 180, GAR, are busily engaged in removing the bodies of the 14th and 27th Michigan Infantry from the old Cemetery on Prospect Street and taking them for burial in their special lot in Highland Cemetery. Twenty bodies were removed.

Fire in the Worden Block owned by the Arnold Estate and occupied by John Gallagher, as a Second Hand Furniture and Clothing Store, was consumed. The East Side of the Bortle Building was badly damaged.

December 13- Ads Appearing: Alban & Begole Clothiers.

Fairchild & Smith-Meat Market

J. L. Hudson Clothier, Detroit Opera House Building

M. P. Holmes-Have secured the services of the veteran Miller, Hiram Allen. We have a large power Sheller and will shell your corn free of charge.

Died, Miss Ida L. Aray in Pittsfield Township.

George A. Neat has now reduced prices:

15 lbs. Sugar $1.00
5 lbs. Java Coffee 1.40
5 lbs. Mocha Coffee 1.25
100 Choice Mackeral .75¢
4 boxes Sardines .25¢

1885 The Ypsilanti Commercial

May 2- Died, John Sedwick Jenness, April 22, 1885. He was born October 15, 1811 in Swanton, Vermont. Married Martha Jane Clark, October 10, 1836 and moved to Detroit. Co-partner with John Smith Jenness in Grocery and Crockery business. Wife died August 11, 1849. In 1850 her married Lucy Jane Moore. In 1859 he came to Ypsilanti and had a grocery store, February 24, 1863, his second wife died. He then married Emma A. Ellis, who was the mother of all his children.

May 7- Harry Sinclair Lewis was born.

June 19- Barhtold's Statue of Liberty arrived in New York.

August 10-First Electric Street railway completed in Baltimore.

October Ads Appearing; P.H. Devoe, Old Flour & Feed Store, south side of Congress.

Lawrence & Smith Grocery-25 Congress street(Michigan Avenue).

E. Washburn & Co., 29 Congress-Fruits, Nuts, Canned Goods & Tobacc

S. L. Shaw-Stove and 4 foot wood, Lime, Cement, Brick Tile-22 E. Cr

Mrs. May McCorkle-Ladies Hair Goods, Hewitt Block over Comstock & Ebling.

Mrs. Curtis-Winter Millinery, No. 6 in Union Block.

Notice: The Saloons, Drug Stores and Hotel Bars are hereby notified not to sell intoxicating beverages to Thomas Honey, James Morris or John McCauley, Sr. Parties selling will be prosecuted-Signed Martin Cremer, Marshall.

Fire: Second Hand store of John Radaway was badly damaged. Had the been a wind the whole row of wooden buildings would have been destroyed. They were constructed by Madison Cook in 1838.

November 7- W. H. Lewis has become manager of the Ypsilanti Sanitarium. He is from Eaton Rapids.

A number of Citizens met at the Follett House to consider piped water for the City.

At the Follett House was Francis E. Brownell, who avenged the death of Col. Ellsworth at the Marshall House in Alexandria, Virginia. It will be remembered that Ellsworth ascended the stairs to the top of the House and hauled down the Rebel Flag. On his way down, the Proprietor, one Jackson, stepped from under the stairs and shot Ellsworth and was himself shot and killed by Brownell. Brownell is now U.S. Pension Examiner and here on official business.

November 7- Canadian Pacific Railroad completed, a transcontinental railroad.

December 18- Ads Appearing: Goodspeed and Sons, 8 Congress Street Lawrence and Smith's New Grocery, 25 Congress Street.

3 lbs. Muscatel Raisins .25¢
4 lbs. Prunes .25¢
Oranges .30¢
Lemons .25¢ dozen
8 Bars soap .25¢
Fair Roasted Coffee .12 1/2¢ lb.
Best Roasted Coffee .20¢

1886 The Ypsilanti Commercial

February 5- Mr. T. Phillips has purchased the Barton House-Mr. Demosh, former owner will raise berries. It is to be called the NEAT House.

President Grover Cleveland married Frances Folsom in the White House.

February 18- ‘The Buyers Guide’, 312 pages, 3500 Illustrations from Montgomery Ward & Co., Chicago, Illinois.

S. P. Ballard had the misfortune to lose his dwelling by fire. (Newcomb News).

February 12- The First National Bank rooms of this city are unequaled in the State. It is a great convenience to have two windows to do business. The decoration by the O.E. Thompson Co., under the direction of his son, Edward is superb. The woodwork by Mr. Fleming and the papering by Mr. Thompson are in perfect harmony. Cashier Pack has reason to be congratulated.

Died, Chester Perry in his 87th year. An early settler, for years he kept the leading Hotel called the Perry House located southeast corner Congress (Michigan Avenue) and South Huron. Afterwards he managed the Bucklin House, corner North Washington and Pearl Stree Francis Lambie and his son William stayed at the Perry House in 1839 when they came to Ypsilanti looking for a farm to buy.

February 22- Charles C. Holland has bought out the drug stock of R. E. Knapp, M.D. on East Cross Street.

R. C. Hayton, skilled gunsmith and doing sewing machine repair, located in old Hawkins House which was moved in 1879 to the rear of the new Hawkins House.

George Gaudy has the Star Bakery at 20 North Huron Street.

S. Von Haller has a Fish Market in the Cady Block on North Washing

March 4- The Ypsilanti Commercial sold to Henry T. Coe and his brother Fred Coe. C. R. Pattison was Editor-Owner for 23 years.

March 19- The Ladies Library is moving to new quarters in the Union Block above Joe Sanders Clothing Sore, 202 West Michigan Avnue, and expect to open April 3rd. It was 18 years ago that a group of women met to organize the Library.

Bankers: Hemphill, Batcheldor & Co., corner of Congress (Michigan Avenue) and North Huron Street.

April 23-A great event took place at Normal Hall for the inauguration of the grand organ built by Messers, Johnson & Co., of Westfield, Massachusetts. The organ will be played by Clarenc Eddy.

Died, Harriet Nawell Long Rexford, wife of Dr. F. K. Rexford, suddenly at her home on North Huron Street. She was born May 24, 1816 at Shelbourne, Chenago County, New York State. She married March 22, 1837 and came the following June to Ypsilanti. A member of the Presbyterian Church.

May 4- Haymarket riot and bombings in Chicago. Labor battling for 8 hour day. Seven police and four workers died, 66 wounded.

June 4- Friends gather to celebrate the 18th birthday of Eunice Lambie.

July 30- Meeting of the First National Bank at which the follow were elected: President, D. L. Quirk; Vice Presdient, Lambert Barr Cashier, W.L. Pack; Directors, D.L. Quirk; S. H. Dodge, E.F.Uhl; L. H. Barnes; Charles King and C. S. Wortley.

August 13- Died, Eveline A. Beckley fisher, daughter of Zdbadee and Linda Beckley. She was born September 2, 1838 in Ann Arbor. Married Andrew Fisher, December 3, 1854 and in 1855 located in Augusta Township. They lived there 32 years. She died August 5, 1886. She was a great worker in the State Grange.

The fire Department was out on Thursday evening to test the effiecy of the pipe laid down from the river up thru Congress Street (Michigan Avenue). It exceeded all expectations throwing streams on Washington Street and two on Huron Street. Everything worked like a charm and now those streets are independent of the old fir cisterns.

September 3- Died, Grove Sanders, age 71 who resided on the Salin Road. He died August 31, 1886. He was born in Lawrence County, New York March 15, 1815, son of James and Betsy Saunders. Moved to Ypsilanti in 1839. In 1859 he purchased 240 acres in Pittsfiel Township. Married Cynthia W. Ballard, January 17, 1850. His broth H.S. Saunders lived in Ypsilanti. Grove changed the spelling of h name from Saunders to Sanders because of so much mixup in the mai with his brother. He was a carpenter and probably built the house at 4980 Michigan Avenue.

September 4- Geronimo the famous Apache Indian surrendered.

September 10-Died, Walter B. Hewitt, September 4, 1886. He was born in Stillwater, Saratoga County, New York, February 4, 1800, s of Elias. His Grandfather, Walter Served in the Revolution. In 1825 he married Polina Childs, Came to Ypsilanti in 1831 and was a shoe maker.

September 30- Died, Polly Bush, Born February 20, 1805 in New York. She came to Ypsilanti in 1824 with her husband, Thomas Bush They lived at Lowell (Superior Township) until 1851 and they lived on East Cross Street.

September 30- Professor McLouth accepted Presidency of Dakota Agricultural College.

November 5- Died, Joseph Kitchen, October 18, 1886. He was born April 25, 1820 at Hackettstown, New Jersey. Came to Ypsilanti in 1841.

Died, Lee K. Forsyth, October 31, He was born in Connecticut, May 15, 1800. Came to Michigan 1830. Married Eveline Welch, May 15, 1831. He was a chair maker and farmer in Augusta Township and was a member of the Presbyterian Church.

Died, Olive Gorton Graves, October 29. Born in New Libon, Otsego County, New York. Daughter of Job and Sarah Emerson Gorton. She taught school at age 15 after coming with parents to Woodruff's Grove.

November 12- Trim & McGregor of Detroit have bought out Born & Mapes.

Died, Samuel Robbins. He was born October 20, 1806 in Harvard, Worchester County, Massachusetts. Came to Michigan in 1869. He was a Presbyterian but turned to the Methodists during a Revival Meeting. Married Rachael Mersereau in 1829. She died in 1862 and he then married Rebecca Swift in 1864.

December 3- Stevenson, the Photographer, has photographed Demetrius Ypsilanti and printed the pictures in various sizes. The Commercial Editor thinks every home in Ypsilanti should have one.

ADS: Hough's Book Store-Huron at Pearl Street.

Banghart & Clark-South side of Congress

“Finest Meats of all kinds”

Johnson & Company-East Cross at the Depot: Groceries,

Notions, Boots & Shoes-Hardware.

Lambert & Sons-Meat Market & Canned Goods at the Depot.

December 8- American Federation of Labor formed.

Understanding a Child's View of Retirement

Published In:
Ypsilanti Gleanings, August 1996,
August 1996
Original Images:

AFTER A CHRISTMAS BREAK, A TEACHER ASKED HER PUPILS HOW THEY SPENT THEIR HOLIDAYS. ONE SMALL BOY WROTE THIS:

“WE ALWAYS USED TO SPEND CHRISTMAS WITH GRANDPA AND GRANDMA. THEY USED TO LIVE IN A BIG, BRICK HOME, BUT GRANDPA GOT RETARDED AND THEY MOVED TO FLORIDA. NOW THEY LIVE IN A PLACE WITH A LOT OF OTHER RETARDED PEOPLE”

“THEY ALL LIVE IN LITTLE TIN BOXES. THEY RIDE THREE-WHEELED TRICYCLES AND THEY ALL WEAR NAME TAGS BECAUSE THEY DON'T KNOW WHO THEY ARE. THEY GO TO A BIG BUILDING CALLED THE WRECKED HALL, BUT IF IT WAS WRECKED, THEY GOT IT FIXED BECAUSE IT ALL RIGHT NOW. THEY PLAY GAMES AND DO EXERCISES THERE, BUT THEY DON'T DO THEM VERY GOOD.”

“THERE IS A SWIMMING POOL THERE. THEY GO IN IT AND JUST STAND THERE WITH THEIR HATS ON. I GUESS THEY DON'T KNOW HOW TO SWIM. AS YOU GO INTO THEIR PARK, THERE IS A DOLL HOUSE WITH A LITTLE MAN SITTING IN IT. HE WATCHES ALL DAY SO THAT THEY CAN'T SNEAK OUT, THEY GO TO THE BEACH AND PICK UP SHELLS THAT THEY THINK ARE DOLLARS.”

“MY GRANDMA USED TO BAKE COOKIES AND STUFF, BUT I GUESS SHE FORGOT HOW. NOBODY COOKS. THEY JUST EAT OUT. THEY EAT THE SAME THING EVERY DAY-EARLY BIRDS. SOME OF THE PEOPLE ARE SO RETARDED THEY DON'T KNOW HOW TO COOK AT ALL, SO MY GRANDMA AND GRANDPA BRING FOOD INTO THE WRECKED HALL AND CALL IT ‘POT LUCK’.’.

“MY GRANDMA SAYS MY GRANDPA WORKED ALL HIS LIFE AND EARNED HIS RETARDMENT. I WISH THEY WOULD MOVE BACK UP HERE, BUT I GUESS THE LITTLE OLD MAN IN THE DOLL HOUSE WON'T LET THEM OUT.”

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